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How Does Air Pollution Affect Heart Health?

February is American Heart Month. And the air around us is one factor that affects our heart’s health every day. Air pollution can trigger both heart attacks and strokes. In fact, did you know that one in three Americans has heart disease which can be worsened by air pollution? Make sure you stay educated on air quality and pollution for you and the safety of others.

Some Heart Facts:

  • Heart disease and stroke are the first and fourth leading causes of death in the U.S.
  • Air pollution can affect heart health and can trigger heart attacks and strokes that cause disability and death.
  • One in three American adults has heart or blood vessel disease and is at higher risk from air pollution

We may not think about our everyday air quality, but emissions and pollutants are all around us. Whether it’s a job requirement or for your own health, learning about air quality, sources of pollution, and what you can do to minimize other health problems are all topics of importance.

Here are some other good resources to keep you informed about your local air quality:

And if it IS a requirement for your job, make sure you stay up-to-date on all of your environmental and safety training here. Envicomply offers the compliance training you need in air pollution, air quality awareness, and preventative measures. Shop our relevant training now:

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Stormwater Pollution – Are You Prepared to Prevent It?

Did you know that Stormwater runoff is one of the fastest growing sources of pollution? In fact, EPA states that each year about 10 TRILLION gallons of stormwater runs off buildings, parking lots and roads picking up things like fertilizers, oil and pet waste which then reach our waterways. These pollutants contaminate our water – the water we play in and even drink!

Heavy rain falling on grass or other natural areas usually soaks in. But on pavement, rain quickly begins to pool, flow, and eventually cascades into adjacent streets and local storm drains. For urban areas with a lot of development, a big storm can mean flooding, combined sewer overflows, reduced groundwater recharge, and increased pollution reaching our Nation’s waterways.

EPA developed the National Stormwater Calculator, an online tool to help support local, state, and national efforts to reduce runoff using green infrastructure practices as low impact development controls. Using local soil conditions, land cover, slope, and historical rainfall records, the Calculator provides estimates of the annual amount and frequency of stormwater runoff from a specific site anywhere in the U.S., including Puerto Rico, that is less than 12 acres.

Check out EPA’s educational video for more information:

Help prevent pollution by controlling Stormwater runoff.

“It’s one of the greatest threats to clean water in America today.”

Educate yourself and others on how to do your job safely. View all of our available Stormwater curriculums now. Training is available as individual modules and convenient course packs.

Add Another to the List! New UST Certification Training Now Available.

NEW UST Certification Training has recently been added to our training catalog. Our brand new 11 module Virginia UST Class A/B Certification Program has been approved by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (by reciprocity) and the Maryland Department of the Environment’s Oil Control Program.

Successfully completing this training will award a certificate which grants UST Class A/B operator certification in the state of Virginia and Maryland.

UST Certification

UST Certification Program includes the following:

  • Module 1: UST Operator Training Requirements
  • Module 2: Underground Storage Tanks
  • Module 3: Spill and Overfill Prevention
  • Module 4: Release Detection
  • Module 5: Corrosion Control
  • Module 6: UST Financial Requirements
  • Module 7: Temporary and Permanent Tank Closure
  • Module 8: Emergency Response
  • Module 9: Registration Requirements
  • Module 10: Inspection Requirements
  • Module 11: Recordkeeping and Reporting

The 2005 Energy Policy Act requires that all UST operators receive mandatory training regarding the operation and maintenance of UST systems. 

EPA established the following minimum training requirements for designated Class A, Class B, and Class C operators. Operators must be trained by October 13, 2018. After this date, new Class A and Class B operators must be trained within 30 days of assuming duties. Class C operators must be trained before assuming duties.

Class A operators

Each designated Class A operator must either be trained or pass a comparable examination that provides general knowledge of the following requirements:

  • Spill and overfill prevention
  • Release detection
  • Corrosion protection
  • Emergency response
  • Product and equipment compatibility and demonstration
  • Financial responsibility
  • Notification and storage tank registration
  • Temporary and permanent closure
  • Related reporting, recordkeeping, testing, and inspections
  • Environmental and regulatory consequences of releases
  • Training requirements for Class B and Class C operators

At a minimum, the training program must evaluate Class A operators to determine if they have the knowledge and skills to make informed decisions regarding compliance and determine whether appropriate individuals are fulfilling the operation, maintenance, and recordkeeping requirements for UST systems.

Class B operators

Each designated Class B operator must either be trained or pass a comparable examination about the regulatory requirements and typical equipment used at UST facilities; or site-specific requirements which address only the regulatory requirements and equipment specific to the facility:

  • Operation and maintenance
  • Spill and overfill prevention
  • Release detection and related reporting
  • Corrosion protection
  • Emergency response
  • Product and equipment compatibility and demonstration
  • Reporting, recordkeeping, testing, and inspections
  • Environmental and regulatory consequences of releases
  • Training requirements for Class C operators

At a minimum, the training program must evaluate Class B operators to determine if they have the knowledge and skills to implement applicable UST regulatory requirements on the components of either: typical UST systems or site-specific equipment used at their UST facility.

View the full list of EPA’s training requirements now.

And this isn’t it! We are currently working on other state-approved UST Class A/B operator training curriculums and will continue to post them as soon as they are available. Keep an eye out for more to come soon!

Get the required training you need. Visit our course detail page to learn more and purchase your training now.

Workplace Safety Resolution

Was Workplace Safety Part of Your New Year’s Resolutions?

One month down… Are you still keeping your New Year’s Resolutions? Perhaps your professional resolution was workplace compliance? Or a safer jobsite? Better dedication to recordkeeping and reporting? Reducing or eliminating violations altogether? Cutting costs? All of these are important factors in maintaining a safe work environment. And the best way to do this is by educating yourself and others. Getting the proper knowledge on environmental and safety compliance can help improve safety, save money on costly fines due to violations, and build your company’s reputation.

And it’s not too late to make a new resolution now. Check out these tips to help you along the way:

Workplace Safety Resolutions for the New Year
Each new year brings about new resolutions that range from the achievable to the downright absurd. Most resolutions tend to center around personal well-being, such as promising to spend more time at the gym to get fit, and setting goals to achieve professionally.

However, very few take the time to ponder on how to improve health and safety while in the workplace. If you find yourself belonging to the majority who don’t make resolutions concerning workplace safety, then why not make this year the time to start making them?

After all, health and safety should always come first. By resolving to act on improving the health and safety in the workplace, it not only ensures personal safety, but also makes the environment safe and ideal for others as well.

Here are some resolutions that focus on workplace safety for the New Year.
1. Look back on the past year.
Blindly making resolutions for the New Year without considering the events that happened in the previous year will only result to half-baked goals. Review the accidents of the year that just ended. Have there been any documented health hazards due to exposure to asbestos – which has been documented to have affected families due to second-hand exposure? How about slips and falls due to construction safety problems? Were safety trainings sufficient throughout the year, or could this have been improved upon and thereby have prevented the accidents from occurring? Use the happenings from the year before to create better resolutions regarding safety at the workplace.

2. Review company policies on health and safety.
Take some time to look through the company policies, and review health and safety rules and regulations. Check if there are ample facilities that can prevent any hazardous substances and materials from sticking to skin and hair (such as asbestos) from being brought home and endangering the lives of family members. Know your rights as an employee, and find out if the company that you’re working for has provided sufficient information on keeping safe in the workplace.

3. Ask questions.
Some tasks may be too dangerous, or too difficult for one single person to perform. When in doubt about the safety of a certain job, don’t be afraid to speak out. Asking questions opens the line of communication between the worker and the management, and may prompt the higher ups to modify safety rules and regulations should one task be found to put health or life at risk.

4. Inspect personal safety equipment and gear.
Is the safety vest still properly fitted, or have the boots lost their non-skid ability? Do the safety glasses still allow clear vision, or does the helmet need replacement? Don’t skimp on this resolution, and ensure that all your safety equipment and gear are in tip-top shape before starting work on the New Year. Otherwise, it’s out with the old, and in with the new.

5. Acknowledge distractions – and throw them away.
Activities that distract from tasks that need to be accomplished are distractions that should be thrown away along with the year that just ended. These distractions take away the concentration that should be poured into the task at hand. One seemingly small slip may have serious repercussions in the form of health risks, or worse, loss of life. Keep these distractions at bay when working, and focus on the job that needs to be done.

6. Know who to call in an emergency.
For any workplace safety-related concerns, knowing who to call or approach is as vital as knowing how to avoid hazardous situations. Emergency situations call for immediate action, so it’s best to find out beforehand who to turn to for those times when safety is compromised at work.

While it is the legal obligation of the company or the employer to provide a safe working environment to its employees, there’s no harm in taking that added step to ensure personal safety at work. Simply becoming better informed about health and safety policies governing the workplace is a good start.

Following these tips and keeping yourself knowledgable with your workplace responsibilities can lead to a safe and successful year. View our full catalog of safety and environmental compliance training now and make 2018 your success story!

NEW TRAINING! New York UST Class A/B Preparatory Program

This thorough 9 module UST Class A/B training curriculum has recently been added to our catalog to help educate and prepare for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Operator Exam.

The 2005 Energy Policy Act requires that all UST operators receive mandatory training regarding the operation and maintenance of UST systems.

The EPA designated three separate UST operator classes, Class A, B, and C. Each class requires training specific to the tasks they conduct. Class A operators must have the knowledge to make informed decisions when it comes to UST compliance. They also make sure their employees are fulfilling requirements regarding operation, maintenance, and recordkeeping for their UST system. Class B operators are responsible for implementing the day-to-day aspects of operating, maintaining, and recordkeeping for the UST system.

With this training program, you will learn state rules and regulations as well as class-specific operator responsibilities and training requirements in the following areas:

Module 1: UST Operator Training Requirements

Module 2: Underground Storage Tanks

Module 3: Spill and Overfill Prevention

Module 4: Release Detection

Module 5: Corrosion Control

Module 6: UST Financial Requirements

Module 7: Temporary and Permanent Tank Closure

Module 8: Emergency Response

Module 9: Recordkeeping and Reporting

Visit our New York UST Class A/B Preparatory Program page for more course details. And shop our other UST training courses now.

Reciprocity: New York DEC also accepts (by reciprocity) the following state operator training programs for Class A/B certification: Maryland, Washington

*This training is intended as a preparatory course and does not provide certification upon completion. A person can get certification if they complete the New York DEC Operator Exam: http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/102202.html

OSHA Cites South Jersey Company for Continued Workplace Violations

OSHA cites company for workplace violations proposing a $199,996 fine for noncompliance. The U.S Department of Labor cites a South Jersey Fencing Manufacturer for continued violations, including safety, cleanliness, and lack of adequate training on hazardous chemicals.

“Jan. 9, 2018

PENNSAUKEN, NJ – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Aruvil International Inc. for multiple safety violations at its Pennsauken facility. The chain-link fencing manufacturer faces $199,996 in proposed penalties.

Agency inspectors identified violations, including inadequate lighting; lack of machine guards; failing to keep the workroom clean and dry; failing to inspect and ensure proper use of fall protection; and failing to provide effective training on hazardous chemicals in a June 2017 inspection. A prior investigation in August 2015 found similar violations.

“Aruvil International has failed to correct similar violations cited two years ago,” said OSHA Marlton Area Office Director Paula Dixon-Roderick. “To protect its workers, the employer should abate these repeatedly identified hazards.”  

The company has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.”

Don’t let lack of training be the cause of any workplace violations. Citations like these can be dangerous and the fines can be hefty. Make sure you stay up-to-date on all training requirements and inspection preparations.

Envicomply offers courses in Safety and Occupational Health, HAZCOM, and Environmental Compliance just to name a few. Learn about federal laws, applicable rules and regulations, how to maintain compliance on the job, and what to expect in a workplace inspection.

Shop our training now

to view available courses that can help prevent violations before they happen.

Deadline for New UST Regulations

October 2018 marks the deadline to be in compliance with the 2015 underground storage tank (UST) regulation and the 2015 state program approval regulation. As part of the EPA’s 2015 revision, minimum training requirements for designated Class A, B, & C operators were established. “Operators must be trained by October 13, 2018. After this date, new Class A and Class B operators must be trained within 30 days of assuming duties.” Envicomply offers state-specific UST Class A/B Certification Programs that can help fulfill your training requirements and keep you in compliance. You can view the EPA’s complete list of minimum training requirements here.

For your reference, here are the 10/13/2018 compliance and operator deadlines:

UST requirements and deadlines

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UST requirements and deadlines

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In July 15, 2015, “EPA published the 2015 underground storage tank regulation and the 2015 state program approval regulation. The revisions strengthen the 1988 federal underground storage tank (UST) regulations by increasing emphasis on properly operating and maintaining UST equipment. The revisions will help prevent and detect UST releases, which are a leading source of groundwater contamination. The revisions will also help ensure all USTs in the United States, including those in Indian country, meet the same minimum standards.” Click for more information on this ruling and implementation timeframes.

UST Class A/B Certification Training is currently available for the states of Washington and Maryland. Successfully completing this training will award a certificate granting UST Class A/B certification.

Washington UST Class A/B Certification Program

Maryland UST Class A/B Certification Program

Visit our Group Discounts Page to ensure everyone in your company maintains compliance and check out our shop to view all available training now.

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EPA awards $2.1 million to California wetlands programs

“U.S. EPA awards $2.1 million to protect, restore California wetlands and streams.” Healthy wetlands and streams are important to all communities. And education is key to help to protect them. Envicomply offers a Wetlands Awareness training course covering a wetlands overview, federal laws, permits, inspection tips, and guidelines for protecting wetlands while working. Stay in compliance with envicomply. Check out all of our available environmental and safety training now.

Click to view full EPA news release.

Dangerous Air Emissions & Air Quality. Stay Safe with Envicomply.

January is National Radon Action Month. Staying educated on this radioactive gas and other dangerous air emissions is critical to keep you and those around you safe. Did you know envicomply offers awareness training in Air Quality, Asbestos, Noise, Odor, Light, & Dust Control, plus much more? Visit our shop now at envicomply.com now to view our wide selection of environmental and safety training.

You can also check out EPA’s resource link for more information on Radon Action Month epa.gov/radon.

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Winter ECATTS Newsletter is Out!